9/17/20: Please Contribute Today to Meet Our Saturday Deadline!

First things first. I’m going to be blunt. My campaign for re-election as your mayor is intensifying.

With 47 days before the election, and a reporting deadline this Saturday, our campaign needs your contribution now.

Here’s the big donate button:

We’re doing great things in Encinitas. Please help us continue! 

This is the time to dig deep and contribute. Every little bit helps. And thank you so much to everyone who has already contributed – I am truly grateful.

The contribution limit in Encinitas is a comparatively low $250 per person and $500 per couple, so if you haven’t maxed out yet, please consider contributing more. If you’re unsure how much you’ve contributed already, you can reply to this email and ask.

Greetings from the real world

As happens near the end of campaigns, negative information increases. It’s already started in the mayor’s race.  

My mayoral opponent is running her campaign in opposition to the improvements we have already made in the city, as well as those we have planned. In some ways this is useful in deciding who to vote for, because it spotlights a clear contrast.

For example, her campaign material (above) shows two pictures of Highway 101 with no cars, no pedestrians and no bicyclists, with the words “quaint” and “safe” beneath them. 

This depiction of the road is pure fantasy – both in the present day and the future. Ironically, even nostalgia for the “quaint” Highway 101 of the past is fiction.

Let’s remember that Highway 101 is one of our city’s major arterials, taking residents everywhere they want to go. It’s a road that changes names and merges with other roads, but essentially runs all the way through California, Oregon and Washington.

It’s worth noting that the idea of taxpayers maintaining a transportation corridor that serves nobody makes no sense. Plus an empty Highway 101 would never be possible, no matter who was in office. And I argue it isn’t even desirable.  

The photo above, looking south toward Torrey Pines on Highway 101, shows the ubiquity of traffic congestion, even during the nostalgia period of half a century ago.

When my grandma was a teenager in the 1930s and her family grew flowers on land that would become part of the City of Encinitas, her family would idle in this kind of traffic on Highway 101 traveling to the Los Angeles flower market on weekends.

The implicit suggestion that by voting for my opponent we can miraculously return to a fictional idyllic past is clearly an empty promise.

Hope, not fear

We’re living in the real world. Change is inevitable. Change can’t be reversed or stopped. Change can only be managed – or mismanaged.

Every time I see my fellow Encinitans walking, running, smelling the flowers, carrying surfboards, walking dogs, pushing babies, leaning on walkers, inhaling the ocean breezes, and exercising on the Coastal Rail Trail or Highway 101, I feel a sense of happiness and satisfaction that we were able to create a public space for all of us to enjoy. 

It’s also worth noting that restaurants and small businesses want attractive, well-designed and maintained public spaces. Businesses move into areas where the government has invested in public spaces to make them nice.

The art of doing the mayor’s job well is to work with the community to find consensus, and then do the hard work to actually achieve projects for all to enjoy.

We all want the perfect balance in our city – vitality, energy and activity – without congestion, and overcrowding. And we also don’t want neglect, decay or dis-investment. I think Encinitas does an excellent job of achieving that balance, but it’s always unfinished work.  

Again, it’s about directing growth and change, not falsely promising to stop it.

Host your own Zoom meet & greet with Catherine!

At top, upcoming “Talk with the Mayor” host Niels Lund distributes invitations in his New Encinitas neighborhood.

You’re invited to host your own “Talk with the Mayor” virtual meet & greet, inviting your friends and neighbors to visit with Catherine. These events are the pandemic versions of the coffees neighborhoods used to hold – intimate, informal and a great way to get to know each other better. They’re some of my favorite ways to interact with Encinitans. I love answering your questions, but also hearing your thoughts and concerns.

If you’re interested in hosting your own “Talk with the Mayor” virtual meet & greet in the next few weeks, please email our friendly and capable Meet & Greet Cooridnator, Kris Powell at kris@blakespearformayor.com.

Goodson project update: new public meeting scheduled

Many Encinitas residents are closely following the status of the Encinitas Boulevard Apartments, otherwise known as the Goodson project, a proposed residential development near the corner of Rancho Santa Fe Road and Encinitas Blvd.

This project submission isn’t complete, and I’m restricted from stating an opinion as it could come before the City Council on appeal. Additionally, I’m very careful what I say about any specific project because the state’s housing regulators read this newsletter and have quoted from it in official correspondence, attempting to demonstrate the city’s supposed anti-housing bias. 

But this I can say – the project wasn’t my idea, nor something I pursued in any way. The developer originally told the city this would be senior housing, and as you may recall, the city was under a court order last year to adopt a housing plan that allowed for the possibility of higher density development to provide a greater range of housing options in the city.

This location is the only site in Olivenhain, and the access driveway is on Encinitas Blvd. The other 14 sites are in other Encinitas communities. 

Here’s an update on Goodson’s recent city-required Community Participation Program (CPP) meeting. The developer claimed that he held the required CPP meeting online July 23, but our city staff determined that it didn’t fulfill the requirements for remote meetings. For instance, there was no public participation during that meeting.

The city is working to ensure that all aspects of the developer’s proposed project follow the city requirements, so the city told the developer that another meeting must be held. The developer is welcome to wait until the restrictions on gatherings are lifted and hold the CPP meeting in person, or conduct another remote CPP meeting that meets our requirements.

An Encinitas Advocate article about the July 23 CPP meeting is here.

As of this writing, a new CPP meeting has been scheduled by the developer for September 25 at 6 p.m. If you want to sign up for the CPP you can do that here. In the last several weeks, there have been other dates scheduled and cancelled, and threats challenging the city on our requirement that another meeting be held that complies with the rules.

As a reminder, this will not be an official city meeting or a “public hearing.” The city sets standards but does not attend or play any role at a CPP meeting.

I’ll keep you up to date as things develop.

In closing, I want to offer my sincere gratitude for your support, and any contribution you can make here! You are an integral part of our team creating the future of Encinitas.

In service,

P.S. Let’s drop some more door hangers!

We could still really use your help delivering door hangers over the next couple of weeks. Our campaign is teaming up to deliver door hangers for County Supervisor candidate Terra Lawson-RemermeCouncilmember Tony Kranz, and Deputy Mayor Kellie Hinze. These touchless door drops of campaign literature for voters are happening on Tuesdays and Saturdays through October 3

If you would like to volunteer, please click this button:

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